When Humans and Gods Meet

“Why do we think love is a magician? Because the whole power of magic consists in love. The work of magic is the attraction of one thing by another because of a certain affinity of nature.” ~ Marsilio Ficino

“Newton was not the first of the age of reason. He was the last of the magicians, the last of the Babylonians and Sumerians, the last great mind that looked out on the visible and intellectual world with the same eyes as those who began to build our intellectual inheritance rather less than 10,000 years ago.” ~ John Maynard Keynes

“Why do we think love is a magician? Because the whole power of magic consists in love. The work of magic is the attraction of one thing by another because of a certain affinity of nature.” ~ Marsilio Ficino

“That’s the beginning of magic. Let your imagination run and follow it.” ~ Patricia A. McKillip

Sometimes I wonder at all of the ads that appear here and there on my computer screen. There are pop up ads, of course, and what they don’t know is that I ain’t buyin’ none of it. Ads that appear on my Facebook newsfeed just annoy me. I ain’t buyin’ none of that either. But these I can remove, hide, whatever. One such Facebook ad tried to sell me a seminar by Neil Gaiman, which can enlighten me to the business of writing. Cost: $180 – if it hasn’t already gone up. It seems the less money we have the more they try to sell us. But the Gaiman seminar – I love his writing, but I don’t think I need his help with mine – not at that price – likely not at any. I mean, I read his novel American Gods. I know how he writes, and that novel plays a significant inspirational part in my nascent novel. What more do I need to know? Do I sound cocky here? If I do, so be it. I don’t have $180 to spare. As to Mr. Gaiman’s approach to the concept of the gods interacting with humans, I got a lot of that from reading Roger Zelazny. And if you really want to go back to 1935 or so, check out The Nightlife of the Gods, by Thorne Smith. Smith was a witty fellow, it seems. Twain touched on it, Thurber too. In the more modern ‘Urban Fantasy’ genre I have to go with Charles de Lint – specifically The Onion Girl. That book changed my perspective on the world, life, whatever. But it is all about magic. All of it. I highly recommend The Onion Girl, BTW. All of this said, I really must be running along. It makes me smile and chuckle to think of myself as one of the nobility in Zelazny’s Amber series, stepping into and through a Tarot card, to return to my workaday life in the “real world”. It is all well and good that I can step into these worlds of wonder and magic, but I have to return eventually. In my workaday world there is not much magic to be had, though it does surface once in a while. Mainly through the smiles from pretty women. Yeh, there is that. And so it goes.

Peace out, y’all. Goof gloriously.

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